Having a caravan on your drive, in your garage, or parked in a secure location, is your ticket out into the countryside for a cheap and cheerful holiday. With the whole of the UK and thousands of scenic destinations on your doorstep, hitching up your caravan for a quick getaway is one of the most satisfying ways to get a break from home - especially after having spent so long cooped up indoors during the pandemic. In this piece, we look at how you can keep your caravan in pristine working condition for the trips you’ll take in the future.

Outer Caravan Care

The outside of your caravan might look like a robust bubble, but there are plenty of seals and joins through which water might leak over time - especially if your caravan is exposed to the elements month on month. Older caravans are more likely to spring leaks, and to gather mould, than newer models - and you should take particular care, if your caravan is ageing, to maintain the outside of your little holiday haven.

You can do this by taking a survey of your caravan every couple of months. Where can you see moisture leaking into the inside of your caravan, and which part of the bodywork do you believe this is coming from? Use traditional leak-blocking material to help you fix these leaks, and prevent damp and other issues developing inside your caravan.

Inside Your Caravan

Damp is one of the biggest issues reported by caravan owners when they choose to take their caravan out for a short holiday. It’s no fun whatsoever to arrive at your destination, only to find that your caravan is damp, cold and clammy. Especially in the winter, this can become an almost unbearable feature of the interior of your caravan.

To avoid damp, leaks, mould, and smells in the interior of your caravan, it’s well worth reading this expert piece on 7 Common Caravan Maintenance Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. It’s recommended that you perform regular maintenance on your caravan, including on the interior, to avoid larger and more expensive problems down the line.

Mechanical Issues

As your caravan doesn’t have a motor - although motorhomes do, and require you to diligently maintain them in order to be able to take them on the road - you won’t need to engage in work on an engine. But you still have two or three important mechanical parts, including the axle and wheels, the lights, and the tow bar that you use to attach it to your car, to look after.

All of these features require timely checking in order to avoid damage on the road, or faults that spiral into major problems if you fail to deal with them in time. As a minimum, before you head away on holiday with your caravan, you should check the lights, the tyre pressure, and the tow bar - ensuring they’re all safe and legal for use on Britain’s many thousands of roads.

Take care of your caravan throughout the year so as to keep it ready for last-minute getaways and longer, UK-wide holidays in the future. You’ll thank yourself for putting in a little effort.

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